Walker signals support of legislation curbing successor’s power

Walker signals support of legislation curbing successor’s power
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Wisconsin Republican Gov. Scott Walker on Tuesday signaled support for a series of bills that would curb the power of his Democratic successor, writing on Facebook that the incoming governor would still have "some of the strongest powers of any governor in the nation" regardless of whether he signs them or not.

Wisconsin Republican Gov. Scott Walker on Tuesday attempted to downplay the impact a series of controversial bills would have on his Democratic successor, telling reporters that the measures are not “a fundamental shift in powers” for incoming Gov. Tony Evers.

Walker’s comments come as he is considering a series of bills, passed by the state’s Republican-controlled legislature in a lame duck session, that would curtail the powers of the incoming Democratic governor and attorney general.

The measures, which have received bipartisan criticism in recent days, would limit early voting, shield a jobs agency from the governor’s control through next September, codify Medicaid work requirements and potentially block the incoming attorney general from withdrawing the state from a lawsuit over Obamacare.

Walker did not say what he would do with the bills that were passed by the state’s Republican-controlled legislature in a lame duck session, but said that he is considering vetoing aspects of the bill and asking government lawyers to determine the extent of his veto power. He also remarked that he didn’t ask for or draft any of the bills.

“For all this hype and hysteria, much of which I think is driven by fundraising for political purposes, the bottom line is there is not a fundamental shift in powers no matter what happens with this legislation,” Walker said at a news conference after a speech about the economy. “Read it, just read it, there is not a fundamental shift out there.”

Walker also echoed what he