Shoal Creek’s Current is More Deceiving Than It Looks

Shoal Creek’s Current is More Deceiving Than It Looks
COPYRIGHT 2018 BY KOAM. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. THIS MATERIAL MAY NOT BE PUBLISHED, BROADCAST, REWRITTEN OR REDISTRIBUTED.
waters edge.jpg

The manager of Water’s Edge Campground where floating is popular says the current on Shoal Creek is deceiving and can be dangerous.

Scott Whitman says when the creek narrows in places the current gets stronger. He says Water’s Edge works to clear debris and trim branches from the float route which is shorter than most. He says floaters really need to pay attention to their surroundings.

“The dangerous part is when the canoe turns over and the current is washing to the inside of the canoe you cannot pull that thing back up. You just kinda have to move it with the current to try to drag it on down a little ways where it’s not quite as swift. But I think the problem’s been, it’ll pin you into brush piles. It could possibly pin you under a brush pile and that’s what’s getting people injured and killed I believe.”

Whitman says heavy rains this summer have kept the creek flowing relatively fast. He says inexperienced floaters should first start on shorter river routes and those with low water levels.