Public Notice from Humboldt: Conserve water due to chemical spill in Neosho River

Drought Watch: Parts of Southeast Kansas Asked to Conserve Water

HUMBOLDT, Kan. – City officials in Humboldt, Kansas advise residents to conserve water after a chemical spill in the Neosho River. A public notice posted to social media states that the City of Humboldt will not be processing water until the threat has passed.

The Humboldt Water Plant shut its intake down Wednesday, Jan. 1st, as a precaution.

The notice affects the City of Humboldt, RWD #9, and RWD #10.

“Please do not fill containers. Limit water use to essential use. The water in our water towers is safe but in limited supply.”

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment stated, “The amount of water currently in storage tanks is limited and water supplies are starting to decline. The City is advising residents to conserve water by restricting usage to drinking and sanitary uses and limit non-essential uses such as (laundry, dishwashing, washing cars, watering plants, etc.) until the water supply can be restored.  The water system is able to meet demands as they exist. However, lowering the demands will extend the municipal water entity’s ability to meet future demands without significant disruption.”

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment is currently awaiting sampling results from the river, and once testing is cleared, plant operations will resume.

KOAM is reaching out for more details about the chemical spill.

Official notice from Kansas Department of Health and Environment:

TOPEKA – A water conservation notice has been issued for the City of Humboldt and Allen County RWD 9 and 10, located in Allen County.  The Humboldt Water Plant shut its intake down Wednesday, January 1, as a precaution following possible contamination to the Neosho River. Residents are encouraged to conserve water where possible. The amount of water currently in storage tanks is limited and water supplies are starting to decline. The City is advising residents to conserve water by restricting usage to drinking and sanitary uses and limit non-essential uses such as (laundry, dishwashing, washing cars, watering plants, etc.) until the water supply can be restored.  The water system is able to meet demands as they exist. However, lowering the demands will extend the municipal water entity’s ability to meet future demands without significant disruption.

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment is currently awaiting sampling results from the river, and once testing is cleared, plant operations will resume.

For consumer questions, please contact the water system or you may call KDHE at 785-296-5514. For consumer information please visit KDHE’s PWS Consumer Information webpage: http://www.kdheks.gov/pws/emergencyresponse/water_disruption.htm

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