Religion/Spirituality Tied to Better CV Health in African Americans

Religion/spirituality Tied To Better Cv Health In African Americans

THURSDAY, Aug. 25, 2022 (HealthDay News) — Higher levels of religiosity/spirituality are associated with intermediate/ideal cardiovascular health on multiple Life’s Simple 7 (LS7) indicators among African Americans, according to a study published online Aug. 24 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

LaPrincess C. Brewer, M.D., M.P.H., from Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and colleagues conducted a cross-sectional study using Jackson Heart Study data to examine the associations between religiosity and spirituality with LS7 individual components and the composite score among African Americans. The odds of achieving intermediate/ideal versus poor LS7 levels adjusted for sociodemographic, behavioral, and biomedical factors were assessed in a multivariable logistics regression analysis among 2,967 participants.

The researchers found that higher religious attendance was associated with an increased likelihood of achieving intermediate/ideal levels of physical activity, diet, smoking, blood pressure, and the LS7 composite score (odds ratios, 1.16, 1.10, 1.50, 1.12, and 1.15, respectively). The odds of achieving intermediate/ideal levels for diet and smoking were increased in association with private prayer (odds ratios, 1.12 and 1.24, respectively). Increased odds of achieving intermediate/ideal levels of physical activity, diet, smoking, and the LS7 composite score were seen in association with religious coping (odds ratios, 1.18, 1.10, 1.32, and 1.14, respectively). Increased odds of achieving intermediate/ideal levels of physical activity and smoking were seen in association with total spirituality (odds ratios, 1.11 and 1.36, respectively).

“Our findings highlight the substantial role that culturally tailored health promotion initiatives and recommendations for lifestyle change may play in advancing health equity,” Brewer said in a statement.

Abstract/Full Text