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Pfizer says three small doses of its COVID-19 vaccine protect kids under 5 and that it plans to give the data to U.S. regulators later this week.

It’s the latest step toward letting the littlest kids get the shots. The 18 million tots under 5 are the only group in the U.S. not yet eligible for COVID-19 vaccination.

The Food and Drug Administration has begun evaluating data from rival Moderna. That company hopes to offer two kid-sized shots by summer.

The FDA has set tentative dates next month for its scientific advisers to publicly debate data from Pfizer and Moderna.

A military plane carrying enough specialty infant formula for more than half a million baby bottles arrived Sunday in Indianapolis. It’s the first of several flights expected from Europe aimed at relieving a shortage that has sent parents scrambling to find enough to feed their children.

President Joe Biden authorized the use of Air Force planes for the effort, dubbed “Operation Fly Formula,” because no commercial flights were available. The nationwide shortage of formula follows the closure of the largest domestic manufacturing plant in Michigan in February due to safety issues.

President Joe Biden says the U.S. would intervene militarily if China were to invade Taiwan. It was one of the most forceful presidential statements in support of self-governing in decades.

Biden spoke at a news conference in Tokyo and said the burden to protect Taiwan was “even stronger” after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. The U.S. traditionally has avoided making such an explicit security guarantee to Taiwan, with which it no longer has a mutual defense treaty.

Biden’s comments were likely to draw a sharp response from the mainland, which has claimed Taiwan to be a rogue province.

Biden has launched a new trade deal with 12 Indo-Pacific nations aimed at strengthening their economies as he warns Americans worried about high inflation that it is “going to be a haul” before they feel relief.

The president says he does not believe an economic recession is inevitable in the U.S. Biden spoke at a news conference in Toyko after holding talks with Japan’s Prime Minister Fumio Kishida.

The U.N. refugee agency says that the number of people forced to flee conflict, violence, human rights violations and persecution has crossed the milestone of 100 million for the first time on record, propelled by the war in Ukraine and other deadly conflicts.

The UNHCR said Monday that the number of forcibly displaced people worldwide rose toward 90 million by the end of 2021, propelled by new waves of violence or protracted conflict in countries including Ethiopia, Burkina Faso, Myanmar, Nigeria, Afghanistan and Congo.

Since then, the war in Ukraine has forced more than 6 million people to flee the country and a further 8 million are displaced within Ukraine.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy is calling for “maximum” sanctions against Russia during a virtual speech at the World Economic Forum gathering in Davos, Switzerland.

He said Monday that sanctions need to go further to stop Russia’s aggression, including an oil embargo, blocking all of its banks and cutting off trade with Russia completely. Zelenskyy also says Ukraine needs at least $5 billion per month.

A Ukrainian court has sentenced a 21-year-old Russian soldier to life in prison for killing a Ukrainian civilian. It is the first conviction for war crimes since Russia’s invasion three months ago.

The soldier had pleaded guilty and testified that he shot the man after being ordered to do so. The sentencing came as the United Nations said the 3-month-old war has helped push the number of people displaced worldwide to the highest level on record level.

The Warriors are in total control of the Western Conference finals, Justin Thomas wins in overtime, the Lightning go up 3-0, the Rangers avoid an 0-3 hole, the Oilers control their series and the Padres blast the Giants.

The head of the World Health Organization has warned that the COVID-19 pandemic is “most certainly not over” despite a decline in reported cases since the peak of the omicron wave. He told governments on Sunday that “we lower our guard at our peril.”

The U.N. health agency’s director-general told officials gathered in Geneva for the opening of the WHO’s annual meeting that “declining testing and sequencing means we are blinding ourselves to the evolution of the virus.”

The WHO leader noted that almost 1 billion people in lower-income countries still haven’t been vaccinated and said vaccine hesitancy around the world has been fueled by “disinformation.”

The White House is planning for what it calls “dire” contingencies that could include rationing supplies of vaccines and treatments this fall if Congress doesn’t approve more money for fighting COVID-19.

Biden administration officials have been warning for weeks that the country has spent nearly all the money approved for COVID-19 response. The administration faces critical decisions about how to spend what’s left.

It’s weighing whether to use it to secure the next generation of vaccines to protect the highest risk populations or to prioritize highly effective therapies to reduce the risks of severe illness and death. Rationing could expose even the most vulnerable to shortages.

The Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are advising consumers to double-check their jars of Jif peanut butter. Jif’s creamy, crunchy, natural and reduced fat peanut butters have been linked to a salmonella outbreak across 12 states that has left 14 ill, with two people being hospitalized.

Side effects from salmonella poisoning include fever, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. The J.M. Smucker Co. announced a voluntary recall Friday of some Jif peanut butter products for potential salmonella contamination.

The company says jars with lot codes 1274425 through 2140425 have been recalled and should be discarded. Jif is sold at retailers nationwide.

Scientists who have monitored numerous outbreaks of monkeypox in Africa say they are baffled by the disease’s recent spread in Europe and North America.

Cases of the smallpox-related disease haven’t previously been seen among people with no links to central and West Africa.

But in the past week, Britain, Spain, Portugal, Italy, the United States, Sweden and Canada have all reported infections, mostly in young men who hadn’t traveled to Africa.

On Friday, France, Germany, Belgium and Australia all confirmed their first cases of monkeypox. One of the theories British health officials are exploring is whether the disease is being sexually transmitted.

Kate McKinnon and Pete Davidson are among those departing from “Saturday Night Live,” leaving the sketch institution without arguably its two most famous names after Saturday’s finale of its 47th season.

Aidy Bryant and Kyle Mooney will also leave the cast after the episode hosted by Natasha Lyonne.

The 38-year-old McKinnon won two Emmys in her 10 seasons on the show, during which her impressions included Hillary Clinton and former Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Her comic chops with characters frequently drove castmates and hosts to lose it live on air.

The 28-year-old Davidson joined the cast in 2014 and has appeared in eight seasons.

—The Associated Press