“Great American Smokeout” Highlights Low Dose CAT Scans as Detection for Lung Cancer

“Great American Smokeout” Highlights Low Dose CAT Scans as Detection for Lung Cancer
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Medical experts put the focus on preventing lung cancer by ditching the smokes. The Great American Smokeout took place yesterday. It’s organized by the American Cancer Society to encourage you or someone you know to not light up and/or make a plan to quit.

Medical experts take the topic seriously. Mercy Hospital in Joplin had a doctor on hand to discuss the topic, including how low dose CAT scans can play a huge role in detecting lung cancer.

“Even if somebody quits today, they’ll still be at risk for lung cancer for a number of years, particularly if they’re a heavy smoker,” says Lance Borup, a diagnostic radiologist with Mercy Joplin. “So this allows us to catch that early and be able to treat that early.”

More than 480,000 people each year in the U.S. die because of cigarette smoking. Experts say more than 11% of the U.S. population is still addicted to tobacco.

“The screening is for people who have no symptoms, but have a significant history of smoking. It will reduce their risk of dying of cancer, lung cancer, by 20 percent. Eighty-five percent of people who get lung cancer are smokers,” says Borup.

Cigarette smoking is still the leading preventable cause of death in the U.S. Each year, ten times more people die because cigarette smoking than opioid overdoses.

“If we catch it earlier, than the people who get this, they can have it taken out earlier, treated sooner, than survive. They’ll have fewer complications. So it’s really quite useful,” says Borup.