Flooding Sends Families to Shelters

Flooding Sends Families to Shelters
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Some temporary shelters in the four states have closed due to lack of use. But in Carthage, there are still dozens of folks staying at Fairview Christian Church.

William and Tina Stanley are the only members of their family at the Red Cross shelter.

“My daughter and her husband is at a friends,” William said. “My son is at his girlfriend’s house. My other daughter, she’s in Joplin. My granddaughter, she’s with a teacher from school. And me and my wife are the only ones together.”

They’re just two of the 30-plus Carthage residents still figuring out their next step, and whether their family will be able to go back home when the rain dries up.

“We’re all a family. We’ve always been together,” William said. “And now we’re all separated.”

“We’ve been [at our current place] four years and it’s never been this bad,” Tina said. “And whenever you loose everything you’ve got, it’s kind of hard to swallow.”

The shelter welcomed 51 residents on the first night.

Many, like the Stanleys, from the flooded-out Kendricktown area of northern Carthage.

“When [families] came in all they had was what they had on and it was soaked,” shelter manager Karen McCoy said.

So the shelter has provided clothes, cots, and hot meals. Just short-term solutions before individual needs can be met. In the next two to three days, Red Cross case managers will make contact with families and help them make their next step.

“They will be helping relocate them,” McCoy said. “And giving them funds to help them with more clothes and food and getting them on their feet.”

“We ain’t got a place to go to,” William said. “So we’re gonna have to take one day at a time and step forward.”