CDC investigates illnesses from raw turkey products

CDC investigates illnesses from raw turkey products
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The CDC, along with public health and regulatory officials, investigates a multistate outbreak of multi-drug resistant Salmonella infections. The illnesses are linked to raw turkey products. The USDA is also monitoring the outbreak.

The CDC released an update on February 15th, 2019.

As of February 13th, 2019, the CDC says 279 people have been reported sick due to the outbreak strain of Salmonella. That number includes four people in Missouri, one in Kansas and six in Oklahoma.

Health officials say raw turkey products from a variety of sources are contaminated with Salmonella and are making people sick. Those who became sick reported eating different types and brands of turkey products purchased from many different locations, according to the CDC.

With the exception of the recalled turkey products, CDC is not advising that consumers avoid eating properly cooked turkey products, or that retailers stop selling raw turkey products.

CDC advises consumers to follow these steps to help prevent Salmonella infection from raw turkey:

Wash your hands. Salmonella infections can spread from one person to another. Wash hands before and after handling raw turkey products.
Cook raw turkey thoroughly to kill harmful germs. Turkey breasts, whole turkeys, and ground poultry, including turkey burgers, casseroles, and sausage, should always be cooked to an internal temperature of 165°F to kill harmful germs. Leftovers should be reheated to 165°F. Use a food thermometer to check, and place it in the thickest part of the foodExternal.
Don’t spread germs from raw turkey around food preparation areas. Washing raw poultry before cooking is not recommendedExternal. Germs in raw poultry juices can spread to other areas and foods. Thoroughly wash hands, counters, cutting boards, and utensils with warm, soapy water after they touch raw turkey. Use a separate cutting board for raw turkey and other raw meats if possible.
CDC does not recommend feeding raw diets to pets. Germs like Salmonella in raw pet food can make your pets sick. Your family also can get sick by handling the raw food or by taking care of your pet.

Officials say several turkey products have been recalled because they might have been contaminated with Salmonella.

Recalls as of Feb. 18, 2019:

On January 28, 2019, Woody’s Pet Food Deli in Minnesota recalled raw turkey pet food. The recalled product was sold in 5-pound plastic containers labeled “Woody’s Pet Food Deli Raw Free Range Turkey” and was sold in Minnesota.

On December 21, 2018, Jennie-O Turkey Store Sales, LLC, in Faribault, Minnesota recalled approximately 164,210 pounds of raw ground turkey products. The recalled ground turkey was sold in 1-pound, 2.5-pound and 3-pound packages labeled with establishment number “P-579”. This is found on the side of the product tray package.

On November 15, 2018, Jennie-O Turkey Store Sales, LLC, in Barron, Wisconsin recalled approximately 147,276 pounds of raw ground turkey products. The recalled ground turkey was sold in one-pound packages labeled with establishment number “P-190”. This is found inside the USDA mark of inspection.

On February 5, 2018, Raws for Paws of Minneapolis, MN recalled approximately 4,000 pounds of its 5 pounds and 1 pound chubs of Ground Turkey Pet Food.

Do not eat, sell, or serve recalled turkey products.

You can read more about the investigation here.