Carl Junction “Aire Fiber” city-wide wireless internet gets problematic start

Carl Junction “Aire Fiber” city-wide wireless internet gets problematic start
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Some local residents say a new type of internet service in the region has had a disappointing first impression. Workers with Aire Fiber, based near St. Louis, say they’re on track to install hardware for this service at more than 200 homes by the end of this month.

But one resident encourages others to be cautious with expectations.

Mark Powers has higher hopes for his internet service provider, or ISP.

“I’m not real thrilled with it,” says Powers.

Powers has still been taking his ISP for a test drive, knowing he’s helping to chart new virtual road maps. His ISP, Aire Fiber, is doing something unlike that of few, if any, other cities across the nation.

“This hardware type is in one of the first poll cities,” says Ben Koeneker with Aire Fiber.

Antennas in the city put out an internet data signal for receivers one each home.

“I believe we are probably the densest, or busiest, networks, largest number of access points,” says Koeneker.

But look closely at some important numbers to compare: “I get anywhere from 30 to 45 with the cable company, on download megabytes per second. I’m getting around 4 to 6 off of Aire Fiber,” says Powers.

“There is a learning curve, admittingly, for both the manufacturer and ourselves, when you’re going large-scale and new tech,” says Koeneker.

The ISP is still working on whether or not there’s any type of solution to how topography affects the data signal. Powers and other Aire Fiber customers have already cut deposit checks to the ISP, but Aire Fiber workers say they won’t cash the checks until the city-wide system is working more smoothly.

“The folks who don’t want to wait for a solution, if they are having problems, they have the option to quit without any obligation,” says Koeneker.

In the meantime, Powers, who is a Carl Junction city alderman, is recommending to his constituents that they be patient.

“If it doesn’t work, I’m sticking with the cable company and I’m going to say, I tried you guys but it just didn’t work out,” says Powers.

Despite a rough start, Aire Fiber workers say they’ve received more positive than negative reviews of this new service.

Powers says he was told by an Aire Fiber representative to keep his old ISP until the Aire Fiber system becomes more reliable.