“Almost” total lunar eclipse to happen overnight (Nov. 18-19)

(Video: Credit: NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio)

PITTSBURG, Kan. / JOPLIN, Mo. – You may have to give up some sleep, but you can catch a historic eclipse overnight tonight.

On November 19, 2021 (late evening of the 18th in some time zones), the Moon passes into the shadow of the Earth. This will create a partial lunar eclipse, but it will be so deep that NASA says it can reasonably be called almost total.

It will be the longest partial lunar eclipse in nearly 600 years.

It can be seen from anywhere in the U.S. as long as the skies are clear. To find out what time it will happen in your area, you can click here and enter your zip code.

What is an “almost total” lunar eclipse?

lunar eclipse occurs when the Sun, Earth, and Moon align so that the Moon passes into Earth’s shadow. In a total lunar eclipse, the entire Moon falls within the darkest part of Earth’s shadow, called the umbra. In this eclipse, up to 99.1% of the Moon’s disk will be within Earth’s umbra.

PITTSBURG, KAN

  • Duration:6 hours, 1 minute, 31 seconds
    • Penumbral begins:Nov 19 at 12:02:09 am
    • Partial begins:Nov 19 at 1:18:42 am
    • Maximum:Nov 19 at 3:02:55 am
    • Partial ends:Nov 19 at 4:47:04 am
    • Penumbral ends:Nov 19 at 6:03:40 am

JOPLIN, MO

  • Duration:6 hours, 1 minute, 31 seconds
    • Penumbral begins:Nov 19 at 12:02:09 am
    • Partial begins:Nov 19 at 1:18:42 am
    • Maximum:Nov 19 at 3:02:55 am
    • Partial ends:Nov 19 at 4:47:04 am
    • Penumbral ends:Nov 19 at 6:03:40 am

MIAMI, OK

  • Duration:6 hours, 1 minute, 31 seconds
    • Penumbral begins:Nov 19 at 12:02:09 am
    • Partial begins:Nov 19 at 1:18:42 am
    • Maximum:Nov 19 at 3:02:55 am
    • Partial ends:Nov 19 at 4:47:04 am
    • Penumbral ends:Nov 19 at 6:03:40 am

Recent Lifestyle Headline: Keeping your kids safe and warm in their car seats